LSAT Prep Course Specific FAQ’s

LSAT Prep Course Specific Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s)

Welcome to our comprehensive LSAT Specific FAQ’s page (LSAT Specific Frequently Asked Questions). Here you will find answers to many questions specific to our LSAT course. We also have a General FAQ’s page (General Frequently Asked Questions) that provides a comprehensive list of answers to questions on a wide range of topics.

How important are LSAT scores to law school admissions?
LSAT scores are very important to law school admission. Many schools weight the LSAT as worth 50% or more of the student’s application package. Law schools look at undergraduate work, strength of undergraduate institution, undergraduate GPA and the types of courses students took in their undergraduate studies. They also consider extracurricular activities, personal statements, community service experience, work experience, letters of recommendation, the personal interview, and internships. While many of these contributions are important, its clear that the two primary factors to get into law school are the LSAT and undergraduate GPA.
Is there any content that I need to review for the class?
No, there is no content that students need to review before attending the class. We want students to come in with a clean slate and learn our proven Sherwood strategies, methods, and techniques.
How much times does the average LSAT student spend working on our prep course, inclusive of homework, practice tests, etc?
Generally 6 – 7 hours per week. This includes untimed practice homework problems and a timed practice test. In addition to the 21 hours of class time students spend about 36 – 42 additional hours on homework and practice tests throughout our six week course. In total, most Sherwood students will spend about 60 hours preparing for the LSAT in a 6 week period.
What is Sherwood’s approach to teaching the LSAT prep course?
Sherwood’s approach to teaching the LSAT prep course is highly interactive. Students learn by doing, navigating through test problems with their instructor in class. It is primarily a strategy and methods approach. We have developed a superior curriculum that guides students through each and every question type they will encounter on the test.
Do you spend a lot of time on Games (Analytical Reasoning)?
Yes. Although games accounts for only 25% of the overall LSAT score it is considered by many the most difficult section of the test. We spend extra time on games in our course and its the first question type we cover. We ensure that students are thoroughly prepared for the Analytical Reasoning section with our extra focus on games.
Why does your company offer only 21 hours of class time?
We believe that 21 hours of instruction time spread across six weeks is the most efficient and optimal test prep course for students. We only teach during our 21 hour course, so no time of it is wasted on proctored tests. Students in addition to class time usually spend about 6 – 7 hours each week completing homework items and a practice test. Total student commitment averages roughly 60 hours preparing for the LSAT in the 6 week period.
Is there content review covered in the course?
No. Content reviews are not required for the LSAT as its an analytical reasoning test that does not require knowledge of math, vocabulary or grammar. Our LSAT course is heavily strategy based. There is a wealth of techniques and methods to learn and memorize to effectively conquer the test.
Why do you offer only 4 – 5 LSAT courses a year; Why aren’t your LSAT courses offered year round?
We only offer 4 – 5 LSAT courses a year because there are only 4 LSAT examination dates per year. The LSAT exam is generally administered in February, June, October, and December; sometimes the LSAC substitutes a September administration for the October date. We directly align our courses to end close to each one of these examination dates. In some years we offer both early and late test prep courses to prepare for the October (or September) exam. We have a break in our course schedule for about 4 months since there isn’t a LSAT exam administered between February and June.
What kind of training do LSAT instructors receive?
Instructors receive thorough and ongoing training in the Sherwood curriculum and methods. We continually update our curriculum to reflect recent test changes and our instructors are versed in the latest LSAT test strategy.
Are instructors available outside of class?
Yes, instructors are available briefly before and after class, and they are also available through e-mail.
Has the instructor taken the LSAT before?
Yes, each of our instructors has taken the LSAT exam.
When should I start preparing for the LSAT?
There are two factors to consider. First, when do you plan on starting law school and second, how much time do you want to spend preparing for the LSAT? You should allow yourself plenty of time to devote to the test prep course, as well as time to complete other law school admissions components.
 
Almost all students begin law school in the Fall semester. Based on the standard admissions cycle students should take the LSAT by December for admissions and entrance the following fall. The October test is the most popular exam date. Some smaller and regionally accredited schools accept the February examination for fall admissions. The June exam is for those getting an early start in the application process.
 
Most Sherwood students will spend about 60 hours preparing for the LSAT in the 6 week period. This encompasses taking 5 practice tests. Some students need additional time to complete their homework assignments, while others want to take more practice tests before their official exam. While our courses align directly with each examination date (except the early summer preparation for the September/October exam) some students prefer to take the prep course farther in advance. For example, some students take our April Start Date Course to prepare for the October exam; this allows extra time to continue to take more practice tests.
When should I schedule my LSAT exam?
For all ABA schools you should take the LSAT by December for admissions and entrance the following fall. Some smaller and regionally accredited schools accept the February examination for fall admissions. We have many course start dates throughout the year that prepare for all exam dates. Our courses are directly aligned with the examination dates so the exam date will follow usually one to three weeks after the prep course ends. Please keep in mind that there are rescheduling fees associated with each test; we are not responsible for the rescheduling fee if you decide to reschedule your exam.
When should I take the LSAT for fall admissions?
For all ABA schools you should take the LSAT by December for admissions and entrance the following fall. Some smaller and regionally accredited schools accept the February examination for fall admissions. Please contact your prospective law school(s) as to when LSAT test scores must be received by the program(s).